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Comments on: How to be a Resourceful Indie Game Developer

Comments on: How to be a Resourceful Indie Game Developer Comments on: How to be a Resourceful Indie Game Developer Learn to code and change your life! By: sagar Thank you so much ! i am learning game development from seamedu.com and your article will help me . By: Ebey Tech Nice article. I found the "Keep it Simple" paragraph most useful, as I am always thinking of ideas to add to my games - I need to remember to keep it simple and allow for added content; but only after my core content is complete. I am a few months into game development with iOS, using their new Swift programming language. My first game Fishing for Granny was a lot of fun to make and I learned a lot in the process. By: Devlon Infotech Game jams have strict time limits, so you don’t want to waste time learning how to do one particular thing. I think some do not allow usage of other assets either, so knowing how to create your own would be useful. I’ve seen some game jam videos on you-tube, they might be worth checking out. By: Frank Hello Nick, Good luck with your big game Neptune Flux! Frank By: Greg Nick, thanks for the article first of all, and the Unity3D course. Jonathan, I've not entered a game jam myself, but if you can at least make a basic game (by that, I mean made your own game,not just followed a guide) and understand at least the basics of the engine you're using, then that would probably be enough. Game jams have strict time limits, so you don't want to waste time learning how to do one particular thing. I think some do not allow usage of other assets either, so knowing how to create your own would be useful. I've seen some game jam videos on you-tube, they might be worth checking out. By: Nick Pettit For 2D games, lots of people use Kenney for their assets: http://kenney.nl/assets By: Shafee Enthralling read, thanks Nick. Could you suggest me a resourceful 2D game development blog since I'm concentrating on developing a 2D game. By: Nick Pettit Hi Jonathan, Here's where I go to find upcoming jams: http://www.indiegamejams.com/ Some of them are online, some of them are local to specific geographic areas, but usually they're pretty fun. In general, most game jams are very welcoming and expect the levels of experience to be extremely varied. Even people without any development experience can be helpful in other areas like sound, music, artwork, game design, voice acting, and more. My favorite game jams are the ones that are in-person, because it's fun to interact with other game makers and work with them for a couple days. One of my favorites is the Global Game Jam, which is coming up in January: http://globalgamejam.org/ By: Jonathan Case Thanks for the article Nick! What level of proficiency should you be at before you look to join in on a game jam or "hackithon"? How do you recommend finding one?